Hard Workers and Hardly Working

There are two very different phrases that occur when you take forms of the words "working" and "hard" and combine them.


In fact, very different is putting it mildly. More like polar opposites, really.


So, today we're going to touch on why we seem to have an over abundance of hardly workings and a severe shortage (think drought) of hard workers.


Anyone here been to a restaurant lately?

Good. Good, glad to see you supporting your local economy.


Now, anyone here have a ... how shall we say it, less-than-stellar waitress/server/hostess or meal at this restaurant?


WHOA! Look at all the hands in the air! Yipes.


Well, at least this hardly working stuff may not shock the socks off of you then.


So, for whatever reason we have a surplus of new-to-the-workforce faces that have reeeeeeeally big ideas about the kind of job they are qualified to do and the skills the posses to do this job AND yet reeeeeeeally miniscule drive to do what it takes to start at an entry-level position and work their way up to those big ideas.


Dearhearts - no person goes from babysitting the neighbor's kid to managerial work. That's not how the dandy world of employment is set up. To earn your pay, you must start at the bottom. And by bottom, I mean literally, the bottom. Usually the floor is the bottom and floor cleaning will most definitely fall onto the list of things you will need to handle to work your way up in the world. So clean floors you must!


Now, here's the real bite out of the crap cookie; most entry-level workers (think teens, high school and college students) are, if not incapable, most certainly unwilling, to complete a task so menial and beneath them (literally) as floor cleaning.


Wants-a-job-Teen: Psssshhh. Floor cleaning?? Do you know what street I live on?


Employer: Yes, I see right here it says 'Houston Street West' but regardless, we do ask all of those employees starting with us to rotate floor cleaning duties.


Wants-a-job-Teen: Sorry but...I'm not cleaning floors. Don't you have anything, like um, where I can set up displays and manage the other workers?


Employer: Yes, yes we do. Fortunately for us and unfortunately for you, these positions are filled. By managers. As in people who have already completed their training and spent time cleaning not only floors but bathrooms as well. They've also restocked shelves, helped unload the truck and emptied garbages. So, does this sound like something you're willing to do in order to work your way up to a managerial position?


Wants-a-job-Teen: (looks up from phone) Um... not really. I was kinda hoping to just start with the displays. Like, I'm really good at making snowflakes. I was hoping I could come in and be in charge of your winter window displays and stuff. ..Maybe tell people how to arrange things and then add my special snowflakes for some seasonal touch.


Employer: Have a good day.


You may think this is an exaggeration. I assure you, this is real life. Happening around us. Because somewhere, somehow, someone decided kids no longer had to do household chores.


This, in turn, caused the children to believe that things happened either A) magically or B) not magically but without them having to do it. They learned early that it was "someone else's job" to take care of that. Then, the real kicker is - if they don't have to do it at home - they don't have to do it anywhere else either.

School? No. Dude, I'm not picking up that paper. It's not mine.

Work force? No. Dude, I did not even go into the dining area today. I worked behind the till - why is it my job to clean the floors out there?

Dorm? No. Dude - isn't there like a cleaning lady or someone whose supposed to take care of this place?

First apartment? No. Dude, my mom is researching cleaning ladies in the area so I can focus on my youTube followers. I don't have time for floor cleaning. You think my followers want to see me cleaning the floor? No. Dude, that is SO not me.


And there it is, the life cycle of household chores.

The seed that is never planted never has a chance to flourish and grow. It just dies.


Well, that's deep Jess - why are you going all philosophical on us?

Here - the Cliff Notes version:

IF YOU DON'T EVER MAKE YOUR CHILD PICK UP THEIR CRAP AT HOME THEN THEY GO OUT INTO LIFE ASSUMING THEIR CRAP IS SOMEHOW SOMEONE ELSE'S JOB. THE LIFE CYCLE OF PICKING-UP-ONE'S CRAP CANNOT BEGIN IF ONE IS NEVER MADE TO PICK IT UP.


So, why am I talking about this? Why is this your problem?

It's simple really.

In today's current market of prospective employees - there are oodles that don't really want to work hard. They'd like to earn a paycheck, preferably doing something that allows them to keep their phone and check their social media and send a few snaps of them in their "uni." In other words - hardly working.

So if you, dear parent-owners, can manage to raise a kid that is, in fact, willing to clean the floor, haul the trash to the dumpster, stock the shelves and wash the tables - then you have a hard worker AND a jackpot on your hands.

Encourage that kid to continue showing employers these fantastic traits he/she has learned. Floor cleaning and trash hauling will OPEN MANY DOORS!


Back in the day - these things were not special. They didn't set you apart if you did them, they sent you home if you didn't. Now, these traits are borderline sacred. Employers will treasure them, praise them and likely promote them.

Things like showing up on time, (or, wait for this one - a little early. GASP! WHAT?! WHO DOES THAT??) not looking at your phone during working hours and a willingness to do the bathroom checks that no one else will - these will set your kid apart! And THAT, my friends, is why I'm telling you this.


I want very much for you to have a kid that picks up their own crap. That can get hired at almost anyplace because their work ethic precedes them. And, most importantly, who doesn't live in your basement giving your cleaning lady another room to clean because they can't seem to find a job that's "the right fit for them." (Translation: they've been let go from every place in town because no one wants to put up with their phone habits and the giant black hole that is taking the place where their work ethic should be.)


I want this for you.

I want this for me.

So, let's do this; let's all say it together (in your loudest voice please. This is no time for indoor voice use. We need to be heard,) "KIDS! GET YOUR BUTTS OVER HERE AND PICK UP THIS HELLHOLE YOU CALL A BEDROOM! THIS IS MY HOUSE AND THEREFORE THAT'S MY CARPET AND UNLESS YOU WANT ME TO CHARGE RENT BY THE SQUARE FOOTAGE FOR ALL THE STUFF YOU HAVE TOUCHING MY CARPET - I SUGGEST YOU MAKE IT DISAPPEAR!


And then sit back. Pat yourself on the back for a job well done.

Not only is that bedroom going to look better but they won't be so shocked when that future employer hands them a mop and tells them to clean the floor. I mean, they might mutter something under their breath about it being "just like at home" but trust me, that will only make that employer very happy to hear.







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